Raspberry Pi DOSBox
In this tutorial I go the through the steps of setting up Raspberry Pi DOSBox. This is a pretty easy process that will let you play the hundreds of great old DOS games that have been released as shareware, demos and of course freeware.

Now DOSbox will only let you play games designed for the MS-DOS operating system. If you want more than just this, then be sure to check out my tutorial on setting up retro pie for the Raspberry Pi.

You will find underneath the installation instructions I go through some of the top games (my personal favourites) that you will be able to play. This list may be handy if you’re overwhelmed with how many games you’re able to download and play.

If you want to hear me talk through the process of setting this all up, then be sure to check out the video below. I go through all the steps to setting this up correctly and anything else you should know.


You will need the following equipment to get this project up and running. You will also need a screen as playing a game remotely will lag lots and wouldn’t be very much fun.



Installing Raspberry Pi DOSBox

Now setting up DOSBox is super easy and won’t take you very long to get it up and running. I will go through the process of installing the software package and mention how you can tweak it further if required. You will need to make sure you have Raspbian installed before proceeding.

  1. First open up the terminal on the Pi.
  2. Bring the Pi up to date by running the following commands.
sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get upgrade
  1. To install we only need to run one line.
sudo apt-get install dosbox
  1. Now let’s move onto configuration. First make a directory where our games will be stored. ~ refers to our home directory, this is /home/pi
    mkdir ~/dos-games
  2. If you want edit the config file you can find it at the following location. Keep in mind the version number may have changed since this tutorial was published.
    nano ~/dosbox/dosbox-0.74.conf
  3. In here you’re able to change quite a few different settings including the screen size, mouse sensitivity and so much more. There are probably too many options to go over for this tutorial so if you want more information be sure to check out the documentation page on the dosbox config file.
  4. Next thing you may want to do is setup mapping for a controller. To do this you will need to launch DOSbox (I mention in this in the next section). Once launched simply press CTRL+F1. You can also use the following to bring up the keymapper as soon as you launch dosbox.
    dosbox -startmapper
  5. For some controllers DOSbox will automatically detect and apply settings for the controller. I know this happened with my classic Xbox 360 controller. It’s also important to note controller compatibility varies from game to game so it may work better in some than others.

key mapper

Installing Games

Installing games is a pretty straight forward process it basically involves downloading and extracting them. There is two ways to do this but the easiest way is to just use the GUI (Graphical User Interface) to move the files to the correct place.

To begin go to the browser of your Pi and head over to abandonia.com as they probably have the largest collection of DOS games currently available for download.

Here you can navigate and find a game that is available to run on DOSBox. In my example I download a game called Outrun. A classic racing game by Sega where your goal is really simple… Reach the end of the track before time runs out. You can crash as many times as possible but it will slow you down severely.  This is certainly worth checking out if you love old school racing games.

Now to move it into the dos-games folder you can either run a line in the terminal or use the GUI.


Now in the terminal you can just run a single line to move and unzip the zip file we downloaded. In this example I am using outrun so make sure you replace this with the same name as your game/download.

To move and unzip the file, simply do the following command.

unzip ~/Downloads/OutRun.zip -d ~/dos-games/


Using the GUI is pretty straightforward but I will just cover it anyway for anyone who is completely new to the Pi.

  1. In the default desktop, simply go to file manager (the filing cabinet icon) in the top navigation bar.
  2. Once this window opens, go to downloads in the left column and you will see the zip file in the right column.
  3. Now simply right click on the zip file and go either cut or copy.
  4. Now go to the dos-games folder and paste it in here.
  5. Simply right click on it and extract it.
  6. Now it’s ready to be run and played.

Playing Games

Now for the best part of the tutorial and that is launching Raspberry Pi DOSBox and playing the games you have just downloaded.

  1. Once you have downloaded and unzipped the game running it is really easy. To do this you will need to open up dosbox, you can do this simply by entering the following into the terminal.
  1. Next we need to mount the folder of where our game is installed to. In this example I will mount the letter c to our directory of the game we’re going to play, outrun.
mount c ~/dos-games/outrun
  1. Now we need to change into the C mount we just created. You can do this by simply entering the letter followed by the semicolon into the DOSbox window.
  1. Then run the exe by simply typing the name of it. Outrun for example you just simply need to enter outrun as the exe is called outrun.exe

DOSbox Terminal

  1. Once that is entered the game will launch and you should be able to play it like normal.
  2. Now some games you will find will run too fast and others too slow. This can be corrected by changing the cycle speed by pressing Ctrl+F11 to decrease cycles and CTRL+F12 to increase cycles. There are also a few other key bindings that you may want to know, these can be found here.

Outrun DOSBox

So What kind of games can you play?

As I mentioned earlier there is literally hundreds of games you’re able to play. If you remember the good ole DOS operating system, then you will probably remember the classics that came from it.

Just to name some of the most popular games:

  • Doom (1993)
  • Oregon Trail (1990)
  • Prince of Persia (1990)
  • Quake (1996)
  • Lemmings (1991)
  • Tetris (1984)
  • Abuse (1995)
  • Liero (1998)
  • 4D Sports Boxing (1991)
  • Arkanoid (1986)
  • Lode Runner (1983)
  • Gauntlet (1985)
  • Leisure suit Larry (1987)
  • Day of the tentacle (1993)

It’s important to know what whilst the majority of DOS games have been declared as abandonware, freeware or shareware there are still some that you’re meant to pay for.


Like every tutorial you’re bound to run into some problems. Here are the most common problems I came across when I was testing this tutorial.

Performance: Whilst most games will run fine you will come across a few that the Pi may appear to struggle a bit on. This of course will vary depending on the version of the Raspberry Pi you’re using. I found overclocking and tinkering the amount of memory reserved for the GPU helped with performance. You can find these settings within the raspi-config setting.

Game won’t load: Unfortunately if a game won’t load it’s likely it won’t load at all. However, some games require that you run a setup file first. Check the game directory to see if there is a setup file and if there is simply run setup within the DOSBox terminal (It may also be called install).

Screen Size: If you want a larger screen then you will need to tinker with the DOSbox settings. Unfortunately, most old games were designed for low resolutions and will likely look terrible if forced to a full resolution.

I hope you have been able to get the Raspberry Pi DOSbox installed & configured. There is just so much fun you’re able to have playing those classics a lot of us grew up with.  If you do come across any problems, have feedback, want to share your favourite DOS Games or anything else then please be sure to leave a comment below.

The Raspberry Pi Crash Course

The Raspberry Pi Crash Course

Enter your email address below to get the

Raspberry Pi crash course delivered straight to your inbox

Please check your inbox for a confirmation email!